Lisa Walser sewing a t-shirt bag

By: Jeff Mogavero

What do you do when you find yourself faced with hundreds of t-shirts that no one wants? After years of events our storage unit was overflowing with unclaimed race t-shirts. Our first thought was to donate the shirts, but no organizations in town needed shirts this year. With a growing mountain of shirts, we decided to get creative by whipping out the scissors and sewing machine. In turn, we addressed more problems than just an overabundance of t-shirts.

For years we’ve been working through a surplus of giant plastic bags, eagerly awaiting the day they would run out and we could come up with a more environmentally friendly solution. If you’ve been in the store recently, you may have noticed that we no longer give out plastic bags. And if you’ve been in our storage unit recently, you may have also noticed that all of our extra t-shirts are gone. In the past few months, we’ve been cutting and sewing old race t-shirts to turn them into reusable bags! We are so excited about this opportunity to reduce waste and provide a useful product to customers who forget their reusable bags. 

While we’re incredibly happy to be reducing the amount of plastic waste our store contributes to the world, we want to remind everyone that using our new bags is not the solution. The t-shirt bags are available to those who need them, but ideally customers will opt to not use a bag, or simply bring their own bag. Our goal is to reduce waste, not create another form of waste!

Speaking of waste, you might be wondering what happens to all of the scrap fabric from our bags. Our sewer extraordinaire, Lisa Walser, came up with a brilliant solution: dog beds! Once she has enough scraps, Lisa stuffs them all in a shirt and sews it shut, making a comfy dog bed to be donated to the Humane Society. 

The best part of our new bags? If you’re in a pinch and need a sleeveless shirt, just cut off the bottom of your bag and BOOM, you have a tank top!

Drop by the store to check out the new bags, but please bring your own! We have the t-shirt bags as backups, but a limited supply that we hope will last a very long time!

A very happy Dominic enjoying a t-shirt doggy bed

By: Jeff Mogavero

After a long winter spent scurrying along icy roads and snowy trails, the warm embrace of spring is a welcome phenomena here in Montana. The snow line continues to flee up the mountainsides as temperatures continue to creep higher and higher. The presence of dry ground and dark ribbons of singletrack sends Missoulians flocking to the trails surrounding town. It’s so much fun to go on a run or walk and see dozens of other people out enjoying the sunshine, fresh air, and plentiful miles of trails. Below are some recommendations for keeping our trails in great shape, current trail conditions, and ideas for your springtime explorations!

Note: to stay up to date on current trail conditions, drop by the store for our trail conditions board by the front door!

Trail Etiquette Reminders

1. Stay on trail!!

It’s almost impossible to go out on Waterworks or the North Hills and not run into someone walking in the grass next to a muddy trail. While escaping the mud may seem like a great idea, it destroys the surrounding vegetation, contributes to erosion issues, and creates new trails that become an eyesore. As we like to say, “keep singetrack single!”. If it’s muddy, stay on trail through the mud. If you don’t want to get your shoes muddy, try a different route on a less muddy trail.

Stay on trail and have fun in the mud!

Tips for avoiding the mud:

  • Go early in the day, when temps are closer to freezing and the sun has yet to thaw out the ground.
  • Stick to trails covered in ice/snow and bring traction devices! You’ll get snowy, not dirty, and avoid the crowds too.
  • Choose trails that have been snow free for a long time – they’re most likely to be dry! 
2. Let others pass

Especially in the time of COVID, passing and being passed on trail warrants respect. The person heading uphill has the right of way. If descending, stop and step off to the side of the trail. Once the person coming uphill has passed you, hop back on trail and continue along. If you come up behind someone, give a hearty “hello!” from a distance so that you don’t startle them. Let them know you’ll be passing, and what side you’ll pass on (“Hi there! Passing on your left!”). Don’t forget to be friendly!

3. Clean up after your dog

We all love having our dog join us on trail. But what we don’t all love is stepping in dog poo or finding those little plastic bags of dog poo plopped along the trail. If your dog goes to the loo, PLEASE pick up the poo! Carry the bag with you and toss it in the trashcan at the trailhead.

Current Conditions Updated 4/5 

Overall, expect drier trails at lower elevations. Mid elevations have mud, with snow/ice in shady spots. Higher elevations eventually all have snow/ice. South-facing slopes have dried out quicker. Trails are starting to get good out there as days stay warm!

Pattee Canyon:

Snow has just about left the canyon! Most trails are dry, but be ready to get dirty.  If you see some charred looking forest, it’s from a recent prescribed burn. Enjoy the campfire smell and lack of smoke :). Expect snow/ice on north facing slopes and in shaded areas. Upper trails by University Mountain have some snow drifts, but they are navigable. The dirt

A trace of snow by the Barmeyer Loop

road that leads up to University still has plenty of snow in the upper reaches. The ridge route to University is doable without traction, but traction will make it much easier. The Barmeyer Loop is mostly clear but does have several icy patches.

 

Mount Sentinel:

The M Trail and fire road are snow-free and mostly mud free. Snow/ice can be found in the trees towards the top of the mountain (on the Boy Scout Trail and between the north and south summits). The ridge trail has a large snow/ice section a few hundred yards below the summit. It is very steep. Use traction or go slowly and carefully, staying on trail. Pengelly Ridge up to the south summit is clear of snow. The Smokejumper trail is icy and snowy enough in its upper reaches that it’s best done going uphill. Traction isn’t necessary, but it is very helpful. Traction IS necessary if going downhill.

Mount Jumbo:

Morning on Mt. Jumbo

The trails south of the summit are clear of snow and ice! They are also mostly clear of mud. North of the summit to the Lincoln Hills Trailhead/saddle is a mix of snow, ice, and mud. The warm weather is eating away at the snow very quickly. Traction could be helpful if you aren’t confident on slippery surfaces. Going uphill on this section is most enjoyable and safest! The trails and two-track on the saddle are in great shape.

Waterworks/North Hills:

The snow has left and trails are mostly mud free! Head out early to avoid crowds. PLEASE STAY ON TRAIL. Waterworks is highly susceptible to trail braiding and erosion. Mornings are the best time to avoid the crowds chasing the warmth of the day.

A group run on the Waterworks trails

Rattlesnake:

Conditions are changing quickly as snow and ice melt. Spring Gulch and many of the trails in Sawmill Gulch are still snowy and icy. Rumour has it they can be done without traction, but it is very slow going. Bring along your spikes to speed things up in case you encounter a dreaded ribbon of ice winding up hill. The main corridor is in good shape for a few miles. The trail up to Stuart Peak is still in winter mode. Stuart can generally be done with just a mile or two of snow come mid May. It is snow free in mid to late June.

Blue Mountain:

Mud and dog poop! A reminder to PLEASE pick up after your dog and take the bag with you! Mud down low, but trails drying out fast. The higher up you go, the muddier and then icier the trails will get. Snow up high by the summit. Also expect snow/ice in shadier sections of trail that don’t see the sun much. 

Kim Williams Trail:

Aside from a few small patches of easy to navigate ice in Hellgate Canyon, the Kim is totally snow/ice free! 

Route Ideas

Once Jumbo opens, I am always itching for an excuse to find myself on the top of the mountain! My number one route suggestion for this time of year is a run or hike up to the “L”, heading to the summit if time/ability allows. All of the trails on that side of the mountain are snow free and drying out fast. 

If you’re looking for a longer adventure, we’ve got you! Jumbo is nice, but the big views and sun exposure of Waterworks makes me yearn for those rolling trails. My solution? Waterworks + Jumbo, also known as Watumbo! Watumbo is a big, wonderful loop that links together Waterworks, the North Hills, and Jumbo almost entirely on trail. It can range anywhere from 10 miles to 15 miles, depending on how creative you get on the Waterworks trails. If you want to shorten Watumbo a bit, you can cut across the Rattlesnake at the Tivoli trailhead to the Mountain View trailhead for a north loop of 7.7 miles, or a south loop of 7.7 miles (It’s amazing how nicely that works out). If you’re looking for a longer run, give this one a try! It’s best to go clockwise so that you can walk up the snow/ice on the north side of Jumbo. Once that snow melts, the route is phenomenal in either direction!

Purple: Full Watumbo route (~10 miles, +2,370’)
Blue: Cutoff for shorter Watumbo (North and South are both 7.7 miles)

Directions:

Make your way from Greenough Park up to the top of the Waterworks Hill. Enjoy the view and keep going, turning right at the fence line. Head down the switchbacks and turn left to follow the power lines in the North Hills. Take the “sunset loop”, sticking to the highest trail/two track. Take your last right and head towards the trailhead. Descend about 1/4 mile before taking a left on single track. Take this to Duncan Drive. Take a left and enter the trails again, heading over the squishy bridge. Take a left after the bridge, then your first right to cross the Rattlesnake Canyon on trail. Stay on trail after crossing Rattlesnake Drive. Pick your poison of trails/dirt road that take you up to the Lincoln Hills Trailhead. Hop on trail there and head up the backside of Mt. Jumbo. Take in the views on the summit then head down towards the “L” and back to Greenough Park. Have fun!!

 

 

Frozen Feet 2021
January 1st – 31st

Congrats! We had a group of 714 participants that logged over 40,000 miles in this year’s Frozen Feet Challenge! This means we almost went around the world twice – impressive!

For those of you who purchased a Frozen Feet t-shirt, the tees are available for pickup in the RE’s basement during the month of February. There will be a clipboard with your name and shirt size you requested – please check your name off the list and choose the size shirt you ordered. Just a reminder, the shirts are unisex.
Once again, CONGRATS on your achievement! You guys ROCK!

Questions? Please contact Ashley (ashleym@runnersedgemt.com).

Looking for a reason to burn some calories before the big holiday feast at the end of the month? Well, look no further!

Runner’s Edge and New Balance are excited to announce a FREE virtual challenge for the month of November! Anyone who completes 20 activities between November 1st – 30th can stop by the store and pick out a FREE GIFT from New Balance. On the day that you come in to pick up your gift, you will also access 20% off any New Balance product!

HOW TO LOG YOUR ACTIVITY
Click HERE to record your activity! Just like the Hoka challenge, you can do it day of or at the end of the month. Just be sure to record 20+ days of activities (1 activity a day) to be eligible for one gift, while supplies last. 

NEW BALANCE GIFT & 20% OFF ANY NB PRODUCT
Your free gift is available for in-store pick up only, starting December 1st – December 15th.  PLUS receive 20% off New Balance only valid on the day of gift pick up (this cannot be applied at a later date).

A big thanks to New Balance for their support in this event!

 

Hoka presents “The Montana Mileage Virtual Challenge”
Bozeman Running Company vs. Runner’s Edge

Does Bozeman Running Company or Missoula’s Runner’s Edge have the most dedicated runners, walkers, and hikers? It looks like…

…Runners Edge! With over 21,000 miles posted, Runners Edge logged more miles than
Bozeman Running Co. who logged a very respectable 15,007. 

We want to thank each one of you who participated in this challenge. Be on the lookout for when you can pick up your Hoka swag at RE and when one of you will win your
FREE PAIR OF HOKA SHOES!

A big thank you to Hoka One One for their support!

 

Bozeman Running Company (15,007.26) vs. Runner’s Edge (21,504.31)

On September 20th, Runner’s Edge Events will be holding the Blue Mountain 30k for the 11th year in a row.  Since 2009, this fall race has been a fundraiser for the Hellgate High School cross country team. 

For the past 7 years, Steve Lodmill and Scott Samuels have run this race together–some years finishing together, and other years within a few minutes of one another.  Both men have children who competed for the Hellgate Cross Country team. Prior to the Blue Mountain 30k, neither man had completed a trail race quite this long. 

We love this tradition between Steve and Scott so much that we decided to find out what brought them to run this race with each other for so many years. Read below to read the whole interview!  

Steve and Scott side by side climbing up Blue Mountain Road. Photo courtesy of Scott Samuels.

 

Both of you have run the Blue Mountain 30k together (or finished within a few minutes of one another) since 2013.  What inspired this tradition?

Scott: I was not a runner when I turned 50-years-old (almost a decade ago); instead of buying a red convertible for my midlife crisis, I decided to do the hardest thing I could think of: run the Pengelly Double Dip! I finished that awesome race, but it thoroughly crushed me. So, about a year later when my dear friend Steve, whose office is across the hall from mine, suggested we support HKXC (which included our oldest kids, Tessa and Sean, on the team) by signing up for the BM30K, I thought he was crazy and I knew there was no way that I could run that race. However, we trained and we ended up having a fabulous time: we completed the spectacular 18-mile course about 45 minutes faster than expected…and that began our long and fruitful tenure as running buddies, which, as Steve mentioned, has included some epic races and adventures.

Steve: Scott and I have been friends for a long time.  Back in 2013, both of us were running regularly, but modest distances, mostly just to get out and get our dogs out in the early mornings.  I had heard of the BM30k from my friend Renate Bush, who said it was fun.  I asked Scott if he wanted to give it a try- both of us thought the distance and elevation were intimidating, since we didn’t really see ourselves in that league of running.  But we laughed and said ‘what the heck?’ and signed up!  We somehow finished without dying and it was the gateway into a series of longer runs that we aspired to afterward, including the Rut 50K, Pikes Peak Marathon, and the Big Horn 50M.

 

Is this a rivalry or a camaraderie? 

Scott: We often cross the finish line together, but we have also taken turns and I think both of us would like to finish under three hours one of these years.

Steve: The BM30k is certainly camaraderie!  We both encourage the other one to run his best race, but we still wind up finishing pretty close every year!

 

What is your favorite part about the Blue Mountain 30k?

Scott: No question: the HKXC athletes staffing the aid stations is the raison d’être! However, the course is absolutely my favorite: beautiful and challenging. I also agree with Steve that the vibe is supportive and joyous.

Steve: My favorite parts of the MB30K are the HKXC kids at the aid stations and the easygoing atmosphere on the course and at the bbq afterwards.  It’s a fun local run that goes for a good cause- keeps us coming back!

 

Any highlights from the past 7 years of running the Blue Mountain 30k that stick out to you?

Scott: One highlight was the first year: I remember climbing up from the last aid station, which is a grunt, and Steve waiting for me at the top in the sunshine utterly bathed in a runner’s high. I also fondly remember cranking down the motorcycle trails toward that last aid station trying to keep up with him and just being a bit out-of-control. Of course, the best memories are those student athletes rooting for us.

Steve: I have a lot of very fond and vivid memories of the run.  Scott and I have both had injuries or health issues that made the course seem especially daunting at times, but it has become the single race that we don’t even seriously question whether or not we’re going to sign up.  For me, it’s the one motivation for staying in reasonable shape in the months leading up to the BM30k!

 

Thank you to Scott and Steve for taking the time to answer our questions and for supporting Hellgate Cross Country over the years!  There are still several spots left in the Blue Mountain 30k. Click here for more information.