So you’ve committed to jumping in your first race, you’re all trained up for the big day, have the shoes, the watch, the hat, and the anti-chafe stuff that your best friend said is vital. But now what?

Race day can be daunting. Looking at the scene when you pull into the parking lot can be overwhelming with fast looking runners jogging about, and hundreds of people all milling around a collection of brightly colored pop-up tents. Where are you supposed to go? What are you supposed to do for the next 15 minutes before the gun goes off?

Pick up your bib early

Here’s how to navigate race morning stress free…

  1. Pick up your bib number – The first thing I do when I arrive at a race is pick up my bib (if you picked it up at a packet pickup the day before you can ignore this step). Aside from your racing outfit that you arrived with, your bib is the most important thing. I then take my bib and head back to the car, and pin my bib to my shirt in the exactly right, OCD measurements I prefer.
  2. Find a bathroom – You’ll be surprised how many times you’ll want to use the bathroom before the gun goes off. It’s best to get in line early and get one trip out of the way. Plus then you know where it is. Sometimes races have “secret” bathrooms: a lone porta potty that’s tucked behind a tree left over from the golf tournament the day before or construction on the neighbor’s house. These are gold. No lines = no stress. Get the lay of the bathroom landscape early, especially in big races.
  3. Warm-up and/or make friends – Racing is about community. Nothing calms me down before a race quite like a warm-up with friends. Fortunately in Missoula every race has a bunch of people you will recognize, and if you don’t there are a bunch of people who want to be your friend. Ask someone to go on an easy 5-10 minute jog to get those muscles warmed up. OR find your friends, tell jokes, tell stories, make new

    Find your spot in the corral

    friends, and generally talk about anything except the race for a while.

  4. Get to the starting line – About 5 minutes before the start of the race (10 minutes in massive races) starting getting into the starting corral. This is your last chance to check and make sure you have everything: shoes tied, bib on, sunglasses, socks you haven’t washed since middle school, etc. I like to find my lucky “spot” in the corral where I am comfortable. Defend your space.
  5. Bang! – When the gun goes off, just have fun! Run or walk like you’ve trained. This is the easiest part of the day. When you cross the finish line, have more fun
  6. Enjoy the day – Congratulations! You just finished your first race. Now it’s time to hang out, cheer on other finishers, and tell valiant tales of your time out on the course. This is what makes races fun: the community afterwards. Some of my dearest friends I met after races. Set up a running date for next week, then sign up for another race before you have time to question your judgement!

    Take advantage of the post-race food

If you are considering signing up for your first race I would highly recommend the Run Like a Mother 5k (for women), or the Mountain to Meadow 5k, 10k, and 1/2 Marathon. Both are very laid back and have a fantastic post-race vibe (meaning food!).

See you out on there,

 

Forrest Boughner

Forrest is a manager and race director at Runner’s Edge, and coaches local adults. He has been racing competitively for the last 18 years and often struggles with remaining calm before races. 

This time of year we are all playing the guessing game of what trail are clear of snow and what still has thigh deep post holes designed to cut shins with crystalized snow.

Here’s a few ideas in and around Missoula that may keep you running snow free. Please remember that if you do encounter mud, snow, or puddles stay on the trail! Run over the snow, through mud, and ankle deep in that puddle. If you have any recommendations to add please let me know!

  1. North Hills – the north hills/waterworks area is almost completely devoid of the white stuff. One or two drifts near the Homestead are easily navigable over the top, otherwise the North Hills are free.
  2. South face of Jumbo – the Jumbo South Zone is now open! Everything from the Cherry Street Trailhead is free of snow and pretty dry. If you’re planning on pushing over the summit to the saddle, however, be prepared for some deep postholing!
  3. Blue Mountain – most of the lower trails are free of snow. Depending on how high you go keep an eye out for lingering snow banks and wet trail. You’re gonna get wet!
  4. Rattlesnake – A lot of the lower Rattlesnake Recreation area is snow free, but there is some ice tucked in shady spots. The south facing trails above Sawmill Gul

    Photo courtesy of Lee Macholz

    ch are surprisingly dry.

  5. Larry Creek Loop – Larry Creek is a hidden little gem at the mouth of Bass Creek. It’s south facing and melts out quick. This six mile loop is worth the drive.
  6. Sentinel – Mount Sentinel is clear to both summits and actually dusty in a few spots now. Seeps at the bottom of the Mo-Z trail add some moisture, but pretty much everything on Sentinel is snow free, just be cautious when considering adding a beacon lap or descending the upper part of Smokejumper.
  7. Little Park Creek/Inez Creek – both of these trailheads up Miller Creek Road melt out early and offer gradual climbs uphill. Be aware that you are sharing these trails with tics, but it’s still very much worth it!
  8. Barmeyer Trail – Is pretty easily traveled now, plus if you make it to the lookout you can see the work Montana Trail Crew just did to re-veg the road cut.

If you have any questions on where these trails are either give us a call, or take a look at the Cairn Cartography map of the area (the featured image). We can point them out to you on the map as well!

 

Happy Trails!

 

 

With dirt patches reappearing on the sides of Waterworks and Mount Sentinel we know trail season isn’t too far behind. But, as excited as we are to get out and run some fresh single track, we do keep in mind a few rules for spring trail running etiquette.

  1. Trails are not like Valentine’s Day, we want single! Help keep single track trails single by continuing to run through the snow and ice. A lot of times the actual trail holds packed ice longer than the adjacent dirt, but tough it out and stay on the path. Every time someone avoids the ice by running alongside the trail, the path widens slightly. Keep it single!
  2. Run through the mud! As the ice melts we may see a week of puddles and mud in the path tempting us to run on the fringes. The same rules apply as to the ice; run through puddles, run through the mud. Some discretion is required here, however. If the mud is incredibly deep and sloppy, please consider not running that trail for another few days. Give it time to dry before you leave deep footprints that will be there until August.
  3. Pick up dog poop bags! This time of year we start to see lots of little ‘presents’ emerge from the snow left behind by our furry friends and lazy owners. Please don’t leave dog poop bags behind thinking, “I’ll get that on the way out.” Please clean up after your dog all the way to the trash can! We can also help keep our trails clean by picking up bags that are not our own. One of our customers reported finding just over 60 bags left on the trail in one outing thus leaving the trail much, much cleaner than she found it.

With Bitterroot Runoff, Sentinel Hill Climb, 11 Miles to Paradise, and Mountain to Meadow all around the corner we are looking forward to putting in some miles on the trails and we hope to see you out there (respecting the trail of course)!

 

 

With March upon us it’s time to start thinking about training for the Missoula Marathon! But how do you start a run training program while snow is still falling, streets are icy, and ski season is alive and well? Here’s a few tips and tricks we’ve picked up over the years….

  1. Ease into it – whether you’re coming from a winter of skiing or a few months of enjoying dark beer and warm cookies, running will add an extra stressor on your body. Give your muscles and tendons time to adjust! Maybe start by running every other day, or significantly fewer miles than you think you can handle. A run/walk approach is also a good option. Take that transition slow and monitor how your body responds!
  2. Keep that traction handy! – today it’s an easy decision: take those traction devices with you. But in two weeks when the roads may be much less icy you may be tempted to put away your traction for the summer. We encourage you to keep traction devices accessible so your decision to take spikes is never determined by what is easily accessible.
  3. Talk to other people – if you are participating in the Run Wild Missoula marathon training class you have plenty of people sharing the road (and the pain!) with you. If you’re not participating in the training class, find a buddy to share the road (and the pain!) with you. Running with others makes the miles fly by!
  4. Don’t be afraid to ask questions – on the surface running a marathon seems easy: the gun goes off and you run until you cross the finish. But there is more to it! Nutrition, shoes, body glide, hydration, and what color sweatband to wear all come in to play. Not to mention the training! No one runner knows all the answers, or what is best for you. Ask questions, play with different options, and figure out the puzzle to the perfect marathon!

As always, feel free to come by Runner’s Edge and ask any of our knowledgeable staff for their marathon (or other distance) training tips. We love to talk running!

By John Fiore, PT
Sapphire Physical Therapy

Icy and snow-packed roads and trails synonymous with winter in Montana are here. While Missoula runners often trade running shoes for ski boots, January marks the beginning of training for the 2019 running season. Runners have numerous ways to transform running shoes into traction beasts to tame the worst winter running conditions. Traction can be added via sheet metal screws, Due North traction devices, or Kahtoola Microspikes. While all of these options will dramatically improve traction, they also place increased stress on the foot. Protecting your feet from the focal pressure points secondary to running shoe traction devices will increase winter running enjoyment and reduce foot injury.

Ice is as firm as concrete. Add wire and metal traction devices between and icy surface and the foot and the stage is set for metatarsalgia. The term metatarsalgia is used to describe “pain in the metatarsal bone(s) of the foot. The metatarsals are located in the forefoot between the bones of the midfoot and toes. Metatarsals are long, slender bones which function to absorb impact and allow the foot to accommodate to uneven surfaces. When a metatarsal becomes irritated due to high, repetitive impact, a bone inflammatory response occurs. Reducing impact, pressure, and weight bearing will reduce metatarsalgia symptoms. A simple rock plate can be made at home to reduce the risk of developing metatarsalgia secondary to running with winter traction devices. Below are several photos and a description of how to make any pair of running shoes into a pair of metatarsalgia-proof winter running beasts.

Materials:

  • Flexible cutting board (purchased for $4.99 at Ace Hardware)
  • Sharpie pen
  • Scissors
  • Running shoes
  • Traction device (Kahtoola Microspikes used for example)

 

Step One:

  • Remove running shoe insoles and place on flexible cutting board
  • Trace insole on flexible cutting board using Sharpie pen
  • Cut out new rock plate with scissors

                             

 

Step Two:

  • Trim rock plate as needed to fit inside running shoes
  • Insert rock plate in running shoes
  • Place insoles back in running shoes on top of rock plate

 

Step Three:

  • Put running shoes on and attach Kahtoola Microspikes
  • Enjoy winter running without associated metatarsalgia pain

 

                          

This article was created Personal Injury Help (www.personalinjury-law.com), an organization dedicated to providing the public with information about personal injury and safety information. Nothing in this article should be construed as legal advice, and it is intended for informational use only.

While running is one of the healthiest forms of exercise, the fact of the matter is that you’re much smaller and harder to see than a car. If you ever run alongside traffic, staying visible is key to having a safe and incident free run. Here are some top tips you can use to stay seen by cars, cyclists, and pedestrians:

Tip #1: Cater Your Attire to the Time of Day
Some clothing is more visible depending on what time of day you’re running. When you’re running in the daytime you should opt for something that’s fluorescent. Lime green is the most striking color to wear, but bright yellows, oranges, and pink all work very well. If you’re running at night it’s not really important to wear fluorescent clothing because motorists won’t see you anyway. What you should wear is something that’s reflective. This allows you to stand out when a car’s headlights pass over you. When a car is far behind you, its headlights will only reach your torso at best, so consider purchasing sneakers with reflective strips. These will be easily visible for motorists from afar.

Tip #2: Run Against Traffic
Sidewalks were not built for runners. Uneven sidewalk and broken bricks are just as dangerous as motorists, if not more so. If you’re forced to run directly in the road, be sure to run against traffic. This will give you a couple of extra seconds to react to reckless driving if need be. When running in traffic it’s always important to follow all local traffic laws and regulations.

Tip #3: Use a Flashlight
If you’re running at dawn or dusk you should always have some kind of light on you. Flashlights are a great option for keeping your path visible as well as alerting motorists to your position, but you can also clip flashing white or red lights to your clothing if you’d prefer to run hands-free. Headlamps may not be the most fashionable option, but they’re a great way to see any hazards in front of you as well as making yourself stand out from afar to motorists.

Tip #4: Run in a Group!
Two runners are always more visible than one. Running in a group essentially guarantees that everyone on the road will see you and give you ample space while passing. Just keep in mind that you shouldn’t run more than two abreast—otherwise, you run the risk of becoming a road hog. Running in a group also gives you the added benefits of accountability buddies. Many studies have shown that those who exercise with friends will work out longer and run faster than they would on their own.

 

Sources

https://www.personalinjury-law.com/slip-fall/accident-scenarios/broken-pavement

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22576339