Lee Macholz is one of our 2018/2019 RErun ambassadors. She is a stud! After work and family time, she still manages to volunteer and/or run many events through Runners Edge and Run Wild Missoula. We got a new trail shoe called the Cloud Venture. Since Lee rocks the trails, we asked her to test out these shoes and her thoughts are below…

OnCloud Cloudventure

Specs: 6 mm; Neutral; 7.9 oz

I grabbed a pair of Cloudventures just before heading down to Moab, UT for spring break play time with the family. I was set to run the Behind the Rocks 30k and still hadn’t decided which shoes to wear. But since I didn’t have the time to take them out for a test run before the race, I stuck with my Xodus because I was already completely un-trained for the race and felt it was not terribly smart to add new shoes to the mix as well. However, we still had a full week to play after the race and I wore the Cloudventure for the rest of our time running and hiking in the desert. I also raced the Bitterroot Runoff in them last weekend so these shoes have seen some great early-season action.

OnCloud is a new brand to me, I’d seen a few folks in them over the past year or so, but I had not yet tried them on. In the store, my initial impression was that they were stiff and didn’t have much cushion.
This impression didn’t last though. As soon as I got out on the trail with them, they proved to be really responsive and comfortable. I find that I don’t need, or even want, as much cushion in my trail shoes as I do in my road shoes. The Cloudventure has good support throughout the shoe. I can feel the arch support just enough to know that it is helping my foot, but not so much that it is too tall. The arch support does feel like it extends forward more than other shoes I’ve worn. It was noticeable enough to wonder if it would hurt or fatigue my foot, but it didn’t take long to get used to it and by the end of my first run I’d forgotten all about that. I tend to get a couple tender toes, but I have not had that issue yet with these shoes. The rest of the fit is good, with skinny laces that don’t come untied and a soft tongue that doesn’t slip or pinch. And they are really light weight – easily the lightest running shoes I’ve ever worn!
The really noticeable thing about the Cloudventure is the sole. It is really knobby and kind of crazy looking. Most of the cushion for this shoe seems to be in the material of the sole. I am not the lightest on my feed on the downhill but the sole absorbs impact really well. The downhill sections of the
Bitterroot Runoff felt really great in these shoes. Then there is the traction. I love the “Missiongrip” traction on these Cloudventures. Wearing these in Moab was super fun and I felt kind of like spiderman on the rocks in these shoes. They gripped everything – going up and going down. The one thing that annoys me about the sole is that the spacing and depth between the lugs will pick up rather large rocks.
You know the feeling/sound when you get a little rock stuck in the tread of your shoe? Yeah, instead of smaller-than-pea-sized rocks that are usually easy enough to scuff out of your tread without stopping, I get thumb-sized rocks stuck and usually have to reach down and dislodge the rock. I’m not sure yet if that was just a factor of the rocks in Moab, or if that will continue to be an annoyance on the trails
around Missoula. We’ll see.

All in all, I think the Cloudventure is a great trail running shoe. My favorite things about them is how incredibly light they feel and how grippy the soles are. This makes going up and down hills a dream. If you are looking for a new trail shoe, check them out and come join me in chasing clouds in the mountains this summer!

Injuries impact nearly 80% of all runners at some point (Br J Sports Med 2007). While some runners rarely miss a training run or race due to injury, many experience a variety of injuries and/or recurrent injuries. The key to effectively treating and preventing running injuries lies in effectively determining the cause of injury rather than treating the effect or symptoms alone.
The strongest predictors of of running injury include a prior history of running injury, running throughout the year without a break, and a rapid increase in running mileage of >10% per week (Br J Sports Med 2007).

Once compensatory movement patterns are addressed through a comprehensive physical therapy evaluation, underlying strength and mobility deficits can be effectively addressed.
If you are looking to improve your running efficiency or are plagued by nagging or recurrent running injuries, a running analysis is a great place to start. Sapphire PT has four physical therapists trained in running analysis. Sapphire PT provides on-site, real-time 2D running gait analysis. We are excited to provide this informative, interactive, diagnostic technology in our Missoula PT clinic. While an iPhone or iPad is capable of recording treadmill running for basic analysis, high-speed camera technology and interpretive software are necessary to objectively quantify joint angles quality of movement. Utilizing 2D video running analysis during a physical
therapy evaluation takes the guesswork out of determining the underlying cause of movement inefficiency and/or injury. Sapphire PT uses the Simi Aktisys 2D running analysis system. Developed in Germany, the Simi Aktisys software records joint angles along the frontal (anterior and posterior views) and sagittal (side) planes of motion as a person runs. Planes of movement and joint ankles (ankle, knee, hip, trunk) are recorded and observed as a person runs. The software analyses the measured video data and an easy to read, usable PDF
report is produced for the runner and physical therapist. Colored LED markers on key body landmarks are read by two high-speed cameras which provide real-time feedback for both the runner and the physical therapist. We also utilize the Run Scribe accelerometer system which accurately measures impact force, pronation angle, pronation velocity. Accelerometer data often reveals compensations for pain, prior injury, or weakness and is used in conjunction with our 2D video system.

Once a compensatory movement pattern is recorded, the runner can return to the treadmill and make changes in his or her running mechanics while observing themselves in real-time on the monitor screen. Coupled with a wireless EMG (electromyography) system, runners can then focus on strengthening weak muscles which play a role in their unique running compensation. Walking biomechanics is fairly universal in healthy individuals, but running biomechanics is diverse and very difficult to accurately assess visually or with a hand-held recording device. The Sapphire Physical Therapy staff looks forward to helping Missoula runners improve their running efficiency and determining the underlying cause of recurrent injuries.


Running analysis is useful for healthy athletes as well by improving running efficiency. Our website (sapphirept.com) has a complete list of our running services. Call Sapphire Physical Therapy (549-5283) to schedule your video running analysis or email me (john@sapphirept.com) for additional information.

John Fiore, PT

So you’ve committed to jumping in your first race, you’re all trained up for the big day, have the shoes, the watch, the hat, and the anti-chafe stuff that your best friend said is vital. But now what?

Race day can be daunting. Looking at the scene when you pull into the parking lot can be overwhelming with fast looking runners jogging about, and hundreds of people all milling around a collection of brightly colored pop-up tents. Where are you supposed to go? What are you supposed to do for the next 15 minutes before the gun goes off?

Pick up your bib early

Here’s how to navigate race morning stress free…

  1. Pick up your bib number – The first thing I do when I arrive at a race is pick up my bib (if you picked it up at a packet pickup the day before you can ignore this step). Aside from your racing outfit that you arrived with, your bib is the most important thing. I then take my bib and head back to the car, and pin my bib to my shirt in the exactly right, OCD measurements I prefer.
  2. Find a bathroom – You’ll be surprised how many times you’ll want to use the bathroom before the gun goes off. It’s best to get in line early and get one trip out of the way. Plus then you know where it is. Sometimes races have “secret” bathrooms: a lone porta potty that’s tucked behind a tree left over from the golf tournament the day before or construction on the neighbor’s house. These are gold. No lines = no stress. Get the lay of the bathroom landscape early, especially in big races.
  3. Warm-up and/or make friends – Racing is about community. Nothing calms me down before a race quite like a warm-up with friends. Fortunately in Missoula every race has a bunch of people you will recognize, and if you don’t there are a bunch of people who want to be your friend. Ask someone to go on an easy 5-10 minute jog to get those muscles warmed up. OR find your friends, tell jokes, tell stories, make new

    Find your spot in the corral

    friends, and generally talk about anything except the race for a while.

  4. Get to the starting line – About 5 minutes before the start of the race (10 minutes in massive races) starting getting into the starting corral. This is your last chance to check and make sure you have everything: shoes tied, bib on, sunglasses, socks you haven’t washed since middle school, etc. I like to find my lucky “spot” in the corral where I am comfortable. Defend your space.
  5. Bang! – When the gun goes off, just have fun! Run or walk like you’ve trained. This is the easiest part of the day. When you cross the finish line, have more fun
  6. Enjoy the day – Congratulations! You just finished your first race. Now it’s time to hang out, cheer on other finishers, and tell valiant tales of your time out on the course. This is what makes races fun: the community afterwards. Some of my dearest friends I met after races. Set up a running date for next week, then sign up for another race before you have time to question your judgement!

    Take advantage of the post-race food

If you are considering signing up for your first race I would highly recommend the Run Like a Mother 5k (for women), or the Mountain to Meadow 5k, 10k, and 1/2 Marathon. Both are very laid back and have a fantastic post-race vibe (meaning food!).

See you out on there,

 

Forrest Boughner

Forrest is a manager and race director at Runner’s Edge, and coaches local adults. He has been racing competitively for the last 18 years and often struggles with remaining calm before races. 

This time of year we are all playing the guessing game of what trail are clear of snow and what still has thigh deep post holes designed to cut shins with crystalized snow.

Here’s a few ideas in and around Missoula that may keep you running snow free. Please remember that if you do encounter mud, snow, or puddles stay on the trail! Run over the snow, through mud, and ankle deep in that puddle. If you have any recommendations to add please let me know!

  1. North Hills – the north hills/waterworks area is almost completely devoid of the white stuff. One or two drifts near the Homestead are easily navigable over the top, otherwise the North Hills are free.
  2. South face of Jumbo – the Jumbo South Zone is now open! Everything from the Cherry Street Trailhead is free of snow and pretty dry. If you’re planning on pushing over the summit to the saddle, however, be prepared for some deep postholing!
  3. Blue Mountain – most of the lower trails are free of snow. Depending on how high you go keep an eye out for lingering snow banks and wet trail. You’re gonna get wet!
  4. Rattlesnake – A lot of the lower Rattlesnake Recreation area is snow free, but there is some ice tucked in shady spots. The south facing trails above Sawmill Gul

    Photo courtesy of Lee Macholz

    ch are surprisingly dry.

  5. Larry Creek Loop – Larry Creek is a hidden little gem at the mouth of Bass Creek. It’s south facing and melts out quick. This six mile loop is worth the drive.
  6. Sentinel – Mount Sentinel is clear to both summits and actually dusty in a few spots now. Seeps at the bottom of the Mo-Z trail add some moisture, but pretty much everything on Sentinel is snow free, just be cautious when considering adding a beacon lap or descending the upper part of Smokejumper.
  7. Little Park Creek/Inez Creek – both of these trailheads up Miller Creek Road melt out early and offer gradual climbs uphill. Be aware that you are sharing these trails with tics, but it’s still very much worth it!
  8. Barmeyer Trail – Is pretty easily traveled now, plus if you make it to the lookout you can see the work Montana Trail Crew just did to re-veg the road cut.

If you have any questions on where these trails are either give us a call, or take a look at the Cairn Cartography map of the area (the featured image). We can point them out to you on the map as well!

 

Happy Trails!

 

 

Raise your hand if you’ve come home from a winter run cold and sweaty with fingers too numb and body so tired that wrestling a wet sports bra off your clammy skin felt like an insurmountable task. Me too. Death by soggy bra is a good way to kill even the coziest pre-run situation but wriggling out of a damp bra underneath a pile of winter layers is the worst.

Enter the Brooks Fast Forward Zip Sports Bra.

I’m not someone who needs a lot of support from a running bra so I usually just go for whatever pullover racer back has the softest fabric or cutest pattern. I have never owned a sports bra that wasn’t a pullover until last month. I always thought the fancy ones with hooks or zippers weren’t for me.

And I was a little skeptical of the Fast Forward bra. Would the zipper make a weird bump under my shirt or bounce around? Would I hear in clinking as I ran? Would the zipper feel like cold metal when I put it on? Nope, nope and nope. Despite the zipper, this bra has a simple construction with a mesh racer back, sleek front panels and a wide soft elastic band along the bottom. Like most bras it came with pads, although, like always, I removed them right away. The zipper has a cozy panel behind it that protects your skin from ever feeling the zipper and the zipper lies smoothly under your shirt. The zipper pull locks down and doesn’t bounce. The best feature? When your run is done the zipper is smooth and easy to undo freeing you from a soggy bra in seconds. No struggle!

A note about fit and sizing: since I don’t need much for support I tend to buy sports bras a size bigger than my normal shirt size, so I can avoid feeling suffocated. This bra fits true to size, and the medium I tested was probably a little big but it was comfortable and I didn’t think about it while I was wearing it. I often find sports bras feel too short, and that I have to keep tugging them down, and that didn’t happen with this one, if anything the straps felt a tad too long. The elastic band around the ribcage is soft and supportive without feeling restrictive.

Despite having a zipper this bra feels light, breathable and sleek, and I’m sure it will be in heavy rotation all summer. I recommend this bra for anyone looking for an option that doesn’t require a clammy wrestling match to get out of.

Sean Kiffe is a Runner’s Edge Ambassador for the 2018/19 season. He is very visible around town as he runs just about every Runner’s Edge race
and Run Wild Missoula event each year. We thought Sean would be the perfect person to review the new product we are carrying, Trail Butter. He often spends countless hours on the trails, so who better to test this product than Sean?! Read his review below and you can also follow Sean’s adventures on instagram@seankiffe.

The Trail Butter brand is relatively new on the running nutrition scene and it is a welcomed addition. The company started in 2012 on a self proclaimed mission to…

“create delicious, all-natural energy food alternatives that provide balanced, slow-burning energy in a convenient portable package, all while using only unprocessed, whole-food ingredients” https://trailbutter.com/about/

It appears that they have done exactly that. As any long distance runner knows, you have to fuel the beast. Testing out Trail Butter could not have come at a better time for me. As I’m gearing up for the coming season of running with a couple ultra distance events on my calendar I’m attempting to explore the range of products out there to find out what works with my digestive system.

I used the Trail Butter product on four different runs. There are several things that I really liked about this product. First, I love the fact that these are made of simple, real, sometimes organic ingredients and when you eat it that’s what it tastes like…real food. Unlike the ingredient lists of other running foods and gels that sound like a chemistry text, the Trail Butter ingredients are simple. There are also vegan options for those of you who are so inclined.

One thing that I really enjoyed was that there was none of the gooey aftertaste or lingering paste in your mouth that you get with gels and that’s nice when you’re sucking wind on the long course. The claim of “slow burning” really resonated with me. The nut component offers a ready source of fat that burns slowly, perfect for those long distance efforts where short bursts of high fructose corn syrup or some other sugar are simply not enough to sustain you for very long. The butter-style format allows for quicker assimilation into your system than an energy bar which would take longer to digest and might be dry and hard to swallow on the run.

The packaging comes in three different styles. The single serving 1.15oz packets are easy to open and resemble the packaging of a typical gel. The 4.5oz pouches were my favorite. I loved having several servings in one reseal-able, easy to eat out of pouch. This limits the amount of garbage and mess that you end up having to tote around the trails with you if you were carrying 4-5 packets of the same product. You can also get the Trail Butter flavors in a 16oz jar, which might be nice for those of you who like to prepare custom running foods. Last year I was fond of taking quartered PB&J banana sandwiches on my long runs and eating them a quarter at a time every few miles. The jar size would be nice for that.

The small company hails out of Portland, OR and still has that homegrown feel about it. I like this and it almost gives it a sort of local feel. The product is not crazy expensive and ounce for ounce contains more calories than the typical 1oz gel packet.

While dark chocolate and coffee was by far my personal favorite, the original flavor and the maple syrup and sea salt both were delicious in their own right. Having a sensitive stomach, I tend to get some discomfort after too many sugary gels. If that sounds familiar to you I think you’re going to really enjoy this product. Trail butter goes down easily, tastes delicious and delivers long lasting energy that’s perfect for the long haul. In summary, Trail Butter is real food, real simple and really good. Trail Butter is a must-try for anyone looking to mix it up with their running nutrition this season.